Isabel Wynn

Isabel Wynn

Equinox Gallery is pleased to announce the representation of sculptor Isabel Wynn. Born in São Paulo, Brazil and raised in Steveston, British Columbia, Isabel Wynn studied ceramics at Langara College and Emily Carr University where the foundations for the methodologies shaping her current sculptural practice were laid. Through the medium of clay, her practice is an exploration of lived experiences, the obscurity of emotions, and the balance between control and uncertainty.
Primarily crafted on the potter’s wheel, Isabel Wynn’s works involve a process of throwing, attaching, and warping to create dynamic and expressive forms. The artist explains: “I was initially drawn to large traditional forms in wheel throwing however my interest in achieving perfection gradually shifted over time as modes of experimentation revealed unexpected and intriguing outcomes.” The expanded scale of her work reflects an especially physical practice, where bodily movement and interaction with the material is highly significant. The resulting sculptures echo parts of the body, complete with folds of skin, slumped flesh, arched spines, and wounds—all reflections of the artist’s bodily experiences.In her works, movement and time appear suspended, capturing moments between the artist’s body and the material.
For a list of available works, please contact the gallery at info@equinoxgallery.com

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Isabel Wynn, Tentando, 2023

Isabel Wynn, Monochrome Reverie 1, 2023

Isabel Wynn, Monochrome Reverie 1, 2023

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Isabel Wynn, Monochrome Reverie 2, 2023

Isabel Wynn, Monochrome Reverie 2, 2023

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Isabel Wynn, Monochrome Reverie 3, 2023

Isabel Wynn, Monochrome Reverie 3, 2023

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Special Project
future relics of our time

Special Project
future relics of our time

Equinox Gallery is pleased to present future relics of our time, an exhibition of ceramic works by Serisa Fitz-James, Jack Kenna, and Isabel Wynn, curated by Andrea Valentine-Lewis. During the Middle Ages, objects associated with holy people and sites were deeply celebrated. Due to their association with saints or with heaven itself, relics, such as bits of hair or body parts, were considered divine. Because the term relic derives from the Latin word relinquere, meaning “that which is left behind,” these objects have become temporal markers for future generations. Reflecting on the material and affective dimensions of Medieval relics, one might wonder, what would constitute a future relic representative of our present time.
CLICK HERE to read essay by curator, Andrea Valentine-Lewis.

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